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Thread: Logo Design Process

  1. #1
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    Default Logo Design Process


    Not really much of a tutorial, but I was bored so I decided to show you guys the process I go through with most of my custom logo requests. The game I will be showcasing is Gowang Adventures!

    Step 1- Information and Research

    Before I start designing the logo, I get as much information as I can from the client I am making it for. The genre of the game, the time period the game takes place in, character names and backgrounds, things like this can all help you come up with ideas for the logo, and to make sure it fits the game nicely.

    Step 2- Sketching

    So with that information in hand, I started sketching a few rough designs.



    The client said:

    "Well the game is holding that power stone or super smash brawl like effect. very adventure/fighter. People hitting each other with Toy Hammers, people using energy blasts but at the same time its trying to get the older anime crowd. The dragonballz crowd or street fighter 4 crowd. So when they look at this i want them to see a fighting label. So they can assume this is going to be a fighter game or adventure game.

    So at first glance its going to have that kiddy like look. Like Klonoa the series had at first glance its very kiddy yet it took on a very serious role talking about Death. So what this game is aiming for is to have a kiddy look like its predessor persona 4 but talk about very heavy things and involve blood and relationships."

    So I tried to give a variety of designs, while trying to follow his guidelines. Finally we agreed on using the second to last design.

    Step 3- Vector

    This step took me a while. As i didn't draw the sketch with a ruler, I had to redraw it in Photoshop using Paths and Vector masks to get it looking clean and straight. (I'm not a big fan of Illustrator) After a few failed attempts, I finally came up with something that looked nice:



    The client was pleased with the result, and urged me to continue.

    Step 4- Color/Effects

    This is the fun part, adding some 'pop' to the logo. I tried many different color scheme and text effect combinations, too many to post here, but in the end I felt this combination looked best so I sent it to the client.



    "Perfect, I love it!", was the his response. So I sent him a .Zip containing the sketches, the finished logo (.png and .psd) and a vector version of the logo (.svg and .psd).

    Not my best, but the client was pleased with the end result and so was I. This is just a simplified version of the logo design process, there are many trial and errors you must go through to get what the client wants, but in the end, when you see your logo on a wallpaper or box art, it will all be worth it

    ~ ~ ~

    Another big part of logo design is that your first finished design won't always be your last. Circumstances may arise where you're client (or you) want to revise the logo and try again. This was the case with the Gowang Adventures logo. My client said he wanted something a bit more 'RPG', because the concept of the game had changed a bit. So I gathered loads of inspirational logos, and got hard to work on some new sketches. Here are some of the ones used for the V2 logo:



    The logos selected with arrows are my recommendations to the client, and after some debating, he chose the 4th one from the top. So again, time for Step 3: Vector. At this point I had become much more comfortable with Illustrator (now a must-have for me) and I used this to trace out my font design, as well as some simple shapes to get the logo started:



    He loved the vector version and urged me to keep going. Unlike the last logo, I pushed myself to make this one very detailed. The fnal PSD file had over 50 layers, each with small effects or adjustments that weren't much on their own, but together really add to the final product. After a few small revisions, here is the final logo design for V2:



    I was much more pleased with this logo than the last, as was the client....Yet this wasn't the end. Like I said before, things are always liable to change. About a month after I send this finished V2 logo to the client, he wanted another revision. We talked about it, and agreed that this logo was very similar to the logo for the World of Warcraft game, and too much so to market with this.

    So for the second time, I scratched all I had and started a new, with some fresh ideas from the client. By now you know how I do things, so I'll skip all the other steps. But in the end, we finally decided on a fresh new design, that was genuine to us, and unique to the game:



    Finally we're at an end. The client loved V3, and since then we've started marketing. I used it as the base of the theme for the website and blog, as well as the game box art:

    Gowang Adventures

    Gowang Adventures Blog

    Gowang Adventures Box Art

    Hopefully taking you through my entire logo design process will help you all with yours! If you have any questions, or would just like some advice, feel free to message me anytime. Good luck!

    -You are not authorized to use or edit any of the images here, not even with credit.
    Last edited by del337er; 01-24-2012 at 09:53 AM.

  2. #2
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    Nice. The effort in putting the tutorial together really shines through.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sarashi View Post
    Nice. The effort in putting the tutorial together really shines through.
    Thank you

  4. #4
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    awesome. it's great to see how you make your awesome logos.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jac7b View Post
    awesome. it's great to see how you make your awesome logos.
    ^ This =]

  6. #6
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    You really put a lot of effort in your designs that's why they always looks clean and smooth. This tutorial was awesome. Wish I know how to use the pen tool as well.
    Best of luck, buddy. =]

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by White_Dove View Post
    You really put a lot of effort in your designs that's why they always looks clean and smooth. This tutorial was awesome. Wish I know how to use the pen tool as well.
    Best of luck, buddy. =]
    Thank you it means a lot

  8. #8
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    This is really cool. Great stuff you got going. I would like to see more .


  9. #9

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    Great work, thansk for sharing the information. It will be very helpful for us. Keep it up.

  10. #10
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    Impressive, i like the way you've put this together.

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by del337er View Post
    Step 3- Vector

    This step took me a while. As i didn't draw the sketch with a ruler, I had to redraw it in Photoshop using Paths and Vector masks to get it looking clean and straight. (I'm not a big fan of Illustrator) After a few failed attempts, I finally came up with something that looked nice:

    The client was pleased with the result, and urged me to continue.

    So I sent him a .Zip containing the sketches, the finished logo (.png and .psd) and a vector version of the logo (.svg and .psd).
    I have gone through this process several times, and I will tell you that if the client wants to print a large banner, sign or other very large graphic, you WILL need to use Illustrator or other vector design program. I have had to provide both an. ai and .svg graphic file to my clients. This is because you just cannot get the same quality when rescaling the image large print purposes. If you ever want to do this as a professional, you are going to need to learn how to use vector tools.

    Inkscape is a free vector tool and is easier to learn than Illustrator, but if you want to go pro, learn Illustrator. No other program is as widely used professionally, not even Corel Draw.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crotale View Post
    I have gone through this process several times, and I will tell you that if the client wants to print a large banner, sign or other very large graphic, you WILL need to use Illustrator or other vector design program. I have had to provide both an. ai and .svg graphic file to my clients. This is because you just cannot get the same quality when rescaling the image large print purposes. If you ever want to do this as a professional, you are going to need to learn how to use vector tools.

    Inkscape is a free vector tool and is easier to learn than Illustrator, but if you want to go pro, learn Illustrator. No other program is as widely used professionally, not even Corel Draw.
    Yes, i realize this, and ive been trying to learn illustrator, but i just need to get some more practice with it. Thanks for the advice though

  13. #13

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    nice logo.. did you use a font or you traced it from your own drawing? i'm amazed on how the logo came up.. thanks

  14. #14
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    If you feel that you're talanted, you should check out LogoMyWay!
    Last edited by swe 08; 07-23-2011 at 09:11 AM.

  15. #15

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    I joined some logo contests before, the best logos doesn't always win.. sometimes it depends on the client's taste.. and sadly some clients have poor taste..

  16. #16

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    That's great but not so good.

  17. #17

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    The Logo Design Process

    When one creates a logo, they should follow a logo design process to ensure that the final design suits the needs of the clients (not their wants)… I have written about the logo design process of professional logo designers in full here however below is the usual logo design process in short:

    1. Design Brief: Conduct a questionnaire or interview with the client to get the design brief.
    2. Research: Conduct research focused on the industry itself, on its history, and on its competitors.
    3. Reference: Conduct research into logo designs that have been successful and current styles and trends that may be related to the design brief.
    4. Sketching & Conceptualising: Develop the logo design concept(s) around the brief and research.
    5. Reflection: Take breaks throughout the design process. This lets your ideas mature and helps you get renewed enthusiasm. Receive feedback.
    6. Positioning: Position yourself as a contractor or build a long lasting relationship. ie. Client tells you what to do OR you guide the client to the best solution. The latter is usually best however personally, I try to find a happy medium.
    7. Presentation: Choose to present only a select few logos to the client or a whole collection. Presenting only the best is recommended.
    8. Celebration: Drink beer, eat chocolate, sleep, start on next logo design. Or a combination.

  18. #18
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    Added version 2 and 3 of the logo. Thanks to Reed for featuring this on the How To page!

  19. #19
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    Did you get paid for making the logo? This is a great insight to how you create a logo. Thanks!

  20. #20
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    Yes I did, for each major logo revision, as well as separate pay agreements for the website, blog, and box art design. There is a lot of money to be made in Brand Design, just keep on practicing!

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